Q1. DRAG DROP - (Topic 4) 

Various protocols are listed on the left. On the right are applications for the use of those protocols. Drag the protocol on the left to an associated function for that protocol on the right. (Not all options are used.) 

Answer: 


Q2. - (Topic 3) 

Which address are OSPF hello packets addressed to on point-to-point networks? 

A. 224.0.0.5 

B. 172.16.0.1 

C. 192.168.0.5 

D. 223.0.0.1 

E. 254.255.255.255 

Answer:

Explanation: 

Why does the show ip ospf neighbor Command Reveal Neighbors in the Init State? http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093f11.shtml OSPF hello packets have a destination address of 224.0.0.5 (the all ospf routers multicast 

address). 


Q3. - (Topic 1) 

Refer to the exhibit. 

A network has been planned as shown. Which three statements accurately describe the areas and devices in the network plan? (Choose three.) 

A. Network Device A is a switch. 

B. Network Device B is a switch. 

C. Network Device A is a hub. 

D. Network Device B is a hub. 

E. Area 1 contains a Layer 2 device. 

F. Area 2 contains a Layer 2 device. 

Answer: A,D,E 

Explanation: 

Switches use a separate collision domain for each port, so device A must be a switch. Hubs, however, place all ports in the same collision domain so device B is a hub. Switches reside in layer 2 while hubs are layer 1 devices. 


Q4. - (Topic 1) 

How does a switch differ from a hub? 

A. A switch does not induce any latency into the frame transfer time. 

B. A switch tracks MAC addresses of directly-connected devices. 

C. A switch operates at a lower, more efficient layer of the OSI model. 

D. A switch decreases the number of broadcast domains. 

E. A switch decreases the number of collision domains. 

Answer:

Explanation: 

Some of the features and functions of a switch include: 

A switch is essentially a fast, multi-port bridge, which can contain dozens of ports. 

Rather than creating two collision domains, each port creates its own collision domain. 

In a network of twenty nodes, twenty collision domains exist if each node is plugged into its 

own switch port. 

If an uplink port is included, one switch creates twenty-one single-node collision domains. 

A switch dynamically builds and maintains a Content-Addressable Memory (CAM) table, 

holding all of the necessary MAC information for each port. 

For a detailed description of how switches operate, and their key differences to hubs, see 

the reference link below. 

Reference: http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/473/lan-switch-cisco.shtml 


Q5. - (Topic 5) 

Refer to the exhibit. 

An administrator replaced the 10/100 Mb NIC in a desktop PC with a 1 Gb NIC and now the PC will not connect to the network. The administrator began troubleshooting on the switch. Using the switch output shown, what is the cause of the problem? 

A. Speed is set to 100Mb/s. 

B. Input flow control is off. 

C. Encapsulation is set to ARPA. 

D. The port is administratively down. 

E. The counters have never been cleared. 

Answer:

Explanation: 

For PC to switch connectivity, the speed settings must match. In this case, the 1 Gb NIC will not be able to communicate with a 100Mb fast Ethernet interface, unless the 1Gb NIC can be configured to connect at 100Mb. 


Q6. - (Topic 7) 

What is one requirement for interfaces to run IPv6? 

A. An IPv6 address must be configured on the interface. 

B. An IPv4 address must be configured. 

C. Stateless autoconfiguration must be enabled after enabling IPv6 on the interface. 

D. IPv6 must be enabled with the ipv6 enable command in global configuration mode. 

Answer:

Explanation: To use IPv6 on your router, you must, at a minimum, enable the protocol and assign IPv6 addresses to your interfaces. 


Q7. - (Topic 1) 

Refer to the exhibit. 

Which option describes how SwitchA will handle the frame just received? 

A. It will drop the frame. 

B. It will forward the frame out of port Fa0/3 only. 

C. It will flood the frame out all ports. 

D. It will flood the frame out of all the ports except Fa0/3. 

Answer:


Q8. - (Topic 7) 

When a router makes a routing decision for a packet that is received from one network and destined to another, which portion of the packet does if replace? 

A. Layer 2 frame header and trailer 

B. Layer 3 IP address 

C. Layer 5 session 

D. Layer 4 protocol 

Answer:

Explanation: 

Router Switching Function (1.2.1.1)A primary function of a router is to forward packets toward their destination. This is accomplished by using a switching function, which is the process used by a router to accept a packet on one interface and forward it out of another interface. A key responsibility of the switching function is to encapsulate packets in the appropriate data link frame type for the outgoing data link. NOTE In this context, the term “switching” literally means moving packets from source to destination and should not be confused with the function of a Layer 2 switch. After the router has determined the exit interface using the path determination function, the router must encapsulate the packet into the data link frame of the outgoing interface. What does a router do with a packet received from one network and destined for another network? The router performs the following three major steps: 

. Step 1. De-encapsulates the Layer 3 packet by removing the Layer 2 frame header and trailer. . Step 2. Examines the destination IP address of the IP packet to find the best path in the routing table. . Step 3. If the router finds a path to the destination, it encapsulates the Layer 3 packet into a new Layer 2 frame and forwards the frame out the exit interface. 


Q9. - (Topic 1) 

Refer to the topology and switching table shown in the graphic. 

Host B sends a frame to Host C. What will the switch do with the frame? 

A. Drop the frame 

B. Send the frame out all ports except port 0/2 

C. Return the frame to Host B 

D. Send an ARP request for Host C 

E. Send an ICMP Host Unreachable message to Host B 

F. Record the destination MAC address in the switching table and send the frame directly to Host C 

Answer:


Q10. - (Topic 2) 

A switch receives a frame on one of its ports. There is no entry in the MAC address table for the destination MAC address. What will the switch do with the frame? 

A. drop the frame 

B. forward it out of all ports except the one that received it 

C. forward it out of all ports 

D. store it until it learns the correct port 

Answer:

Explanation: 

Understanding this concept is prime for understanding that when switch receives the data frame from the host not having the MAC address already in the MAC table, it will add the MAC address to the source port on the MAC address table and sends the data frame. If the switch already has the MAC address in its table for the destination, it will forward the frame directly to the destination port. If it was not already in its MAC table, then they frame would have been flooded out all ports except for the port that it came from.